Key Concerns When Finding a Teleradiology Partner

Finding the right teleradiology partner becomes paramount, especially when faced with staffing shortages at hospitals, urgent care centers, or other healthcare facilities. As these institutions strive to maintain high-quality patient care amidst limited resources, outsourcing radiology services can provide a lifeline and has many benefits. However, the decision to engage a teleradiology partner demands careful consideration. From ensuring rapid turnaround times to guaranteeing impeccable quality and compliance, several crucial factors must be scrutinized to identify the ideal partner. Let’s delve into the essentials of what healthcare providers need to look out for when selecting a teleradiology partner in such critical circumstances.

Guide for Choosing a Radiology Partner

Quality Workflow: Quality assurance in teleradiology involves ensuring that the interpretations provided by the radiologists are accurate and reliable. This includes verifying the qualifications and expertise of the interpreting radiologists, as well as implementing processes for peer review and ongoing quality monitoring.

 

Subspecialties: If your healthcare center needs specific types of readings like those for EKGs, ECHO, or DXA, it’s good to research if the teleradiology company offers these subspecialties for both preliminary and final readings.

 

Credentialing and Licensing: It’s crucial to confirm that the radiologists working with the teleradiology partner are appropriately licensed and credentialed to practice in the relevant jurisdictions. This involves verifying their credentials, certifications, and licensure status to ensure compliance with regulatory requirements. Vesta’s radiologists are all U.S. Board Certified.

 

Turnaround Time: Prompt delivery of radiology reports is essential for timely patient care and treatment decisions. When selecting a teleradiology partner, it’s important to inquire about their average turnaround times and their ability to meet the facility’s specific needs, especially during peak periods or emergencies. Expect fast turnaround times with Vesta. In fact, Vesta can meet emergency STAT needs and provide reports within just 30 minutes with accurate and high-quality reports.

turnaround times
Ask about their turnaround times

Security and Compliance: Teleradiology involves the transmission and storage of sensitive patient information, making data security and compliance with privacy regulations paramount. Healthcare providers should ensure that their teleradiology partner adheres to industry-standard security protocols, such as HIPAA compliance, and employs encryption and other measures to safeguard patient data. Vesta is 100% HIPAA compliant.

 

Communication and Collaboration: Effective communication channels between the healthcare facility and the teleradiology partner are essential for seamless collaboration. This includes establishing protocols for communication of urgent findings, as well as integrating teleradiology reports into the facility’s electronic health record (EHR) system for easy access by clinicians. Vesta is at your service 24/7/365. We not only retain the services of exceptional Radiologists who are immediately available to your referring physicians, we also employ a knowledgeable staff ready to address any questions.

reporting

 

Technical Support: Reliable IT infrastructure and technical support are essential for smooth image transmission and workflow efficiency. Healthcare providers should assess the teleradiology partner’s IT capabilities, including their systems for image transfer, storage, and viewing, as well as their responsiveness to technical issues or downtime.

 

Cost-effectiveness: While quality of service is paramount, healthcare providers must also consider the cost-effectiveness of partnering with a teleradiology provider. This involves evaluating the partner’s pricing structure, including any subscription fees, per-case charges, or additional costs for expedited services, and comparing it with the value provided. Vesta helps healthcare providers whether they have small, medium or even large volumes.

 

Reputation and Experience: Partnering with a reputable teleradiology provider with a proven track record is crucial for peace of mind and quality assurance. Healthcare providers should research the partner’s reputation, including client testimonials, case studies, and industry recognition, and assess their experience in providing teleradiology services to similar facilities or specialties. Vesta has been in service for over 16 years and has a proven track record of success!

 

Expert Teleradiology Company in the US: Vesta

Do you need a qualified teleradiology partner? Vesta is here for you whether in full capacity or just partially. Contact us to learn more: 877-558-3782

 

Sources:

Medium.com
openai..com

 

How Does Teleradiology Actually Work?

In today’s rapidly evolving healthcare landscape, the prominence and necessity of teleradiology have surged to the forefront. With advancements in technology and the growing demand for efficient, timely, and accurate diagnostic services, especially in light of staffing shortages, teleradiology has emerged as a pivotal solution. Teleradiology not only addresses the increasing demand for imaging interpretations but also bridges geographical gaps, enabling swift access to specialized radiologists regardless of location. Its rising popularity stems from its ability to enhance healthcare delivery by offering remote interpretations, thereby improving patient outcomes and streamlining diagnostic processes in a progressively interconnected world.

Teleradiology operates by leveraging digital communication technologies to transmit medical images, such as X-rays, MRIs, CT scans, and ultrasounds, from one location to another for interpretation and diagnosis.

Here’s a breakdown of how teleradiology works in real time:

Image Capture: Medical images are taken at a healthcare facility using specialized imaging equipment, creating digital files.

Image Transmission: These digital images are securely transmitted over networks, often utilizing Picture Archiving and Communication Systems (PACS) or secure internet connections.

Remote Interpretation: Radiologists, often located at a different site or working remotely, receive these images. They access the images through specialized software, review them in real time, and provide interpretations, diagnoses, and reports.

Consultation and Reporting: Upon reviewing the images, radiologists generate detailed reports containing their findings, interpretations, and recommendations. They may also engage in consultations with healthcare providers or specialists as needed.

Communication: The reports and findings are transmitted back to the referring healthcare facility, where they become part of the patient’s medical record. This allows for prompt decision-making and treatment planning by the attending physicians.

how teleradiology works
Physicians go over a patient’s scan

Quality Control: Teleradiology services often have quality assurance measures in place to ensure accurate and timely interpretations, adhering to industry standards and protocols.

 

Throughout this process, encryption and secure transmission protocols are employed to safeguard patient data and comply with healthcare privacy regulations (such as HIPAA in the United States). The real-time nature of teleradiology facilitates quicker diagnoses, especially in emergency situations, and enables access to specialized expertise irrespective of geographical barriers.

 

Top Teleradiology Company: Vesta is Here for You 24/7/365

Vesta is here to be your supporting partner in radiology, even for subspecialties. We offer fast turnaround for both STAT and Routine studies. Your staff is important–they don’t always work around the clock and shouldn’t have to. With our teleradiology services, you can allow your staff a better work-life balance while we fill in those gaps whether it’s during night hours, weekends, holidays.

 

Sources:

Acr.org
openai.com

 

Teleradiology FAQ: How Are Teleradiology Reports Delivered?

A healthcare facility – hospital, private practice, imaging center – may choose to utilize the services of a teleradiology company to enhance their radiology capabilities and streamline their diagnostic imaging processes. Teleradiology services offers numerous advantages, such as increased access to specialized radiologists, expedited turnaround times, reduced waiting time for patients, and improved patient care. By partnering with a reputable teleradiology company, healthcare facilities can leverage advanced technology, secure data transmission, and a network of skilled radiologists to obtain accurate and timely radiology preliminary and final interpretations. This collaboration allows healthcare providers to optimize their resources, extend their coverage, and ultimately deliver high-quality diagnostic imaging services to their patients, regardless of time or location.

Teleradiology Reports Delivery

Before engaging with an outsourced radiology company, you may wonder how reports are delivered. Teleradiology specialists deliver their reports through secure electronic means, utilizing advanced technology and secure communication platforms.

telerad

When you partner with Vesta, a Gateway application is installed remotely to allow your systems direct access to our PACS. Once linked, your technicians send exams straight from your machine to our PACS. Vesta account specialists assign it to the proper physician who read and dictate the report, it’s uploaded to your branded template where it’s easily accessible for your facility to access and download!

These customized reports can also be distributed electronically, and any critical findings are immediately shared with the facility via phone, email, or text. We also facilitate callbacks between the physician and radiologist and provide an unlimited amount of customized report templates with your facility’s information and logo. It’s a seamless experience which allows you to focus on what matters most, the patient experience.

Safety and Security: HIPAA

Teleradiology companies like Vesta prioritize the security and confidentiality of patient data throughout the entire process. They employ strict data encryption, comply with privacy regulations (such as HIPAA in the United States), and implement robust security measures to protect patient information during transmission and storage.

hipaa compliance
Look to Vesta for secure and compliant reports

Looking to outsource your radiology interpretations? Please reach out to Vesta to learn more. Vesta Teleradiology can accommodate any type of volume, large, medium and small.

Sources

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov
https://openai.com

The Role of 3D Printing in Radiology

3D printing is an incredible technological tool both in and out of the medical world. Fortunately, this revolutionary technology has opened up an entirely new realm of possibilities for medical professionals to better their patients care. 

Why Is 3D Printing Important To Medical Professionals?

3D printing has enabled doctors to create models of patients’ organs, tissues, and bones that can show the precise image of the patient’s anatomy, enabling them to make more thorough and accurate diagnoses. This means that diseases can be caught faster, leading to a higher percentage rate of positive outcomes. 

These models are helpful to ensure quality by using test treatments on a physical model before trying them on a patient. This can help to reduce the risk of adverse reactions and ensure that the treatment is as effective as possible. In addition, 3D printing can be used to create prosthetic limbs, allowing patients to receive a personalized prosthesis that is custom fit to their body.

prosthetic limbs
Prosthetic limbs

Finally, 3D printing is being used to create custom medical implants. Medical implants are used to replace missing or damaged tissue. They are typically made of titanium or other materials, but 3D printing has enabled medical professionals to create custom implants that are specifically designed for each patient. This has improved patient outcomes and allowed doctors to create implants that are more effective than ever before.

3D Printing In Radiology

In an interview for the American College of Radiology, Kenneth C. Wang, MD, Ph.D. said, “the benefit of printing comes from the patient-specific nature of what is depicted. And that almost always starts with imaging. That’s why we, as radiologists, are so well positioned to be at the center of these workflows. We can use our deep understanding of imaging modalities, anatomy, and disease to create models, interpret findings and also to know the limitations of the images, and communicate with other providers.” 

3D printing has become an increasingly common and useful tool for radiologists. Because it can be used to create customized models of organs, bones, and other body parts, it gives radiologists a better visualization and understanding of medical conditions that couldn’t be seen before. The in-depth imaging 3D printing provides can also be used to create medical implants, such as scaffolds for bone regeneration and customized joint replacements. 

3d printing imaging
3D printer

3D-printed models of organs can be used to practice minimally invasive procedures and to create guides for surgeons to follow during operations. 

This will help with medical education, allowing students and radiologists to visualize the anatomy and better understand medical conditions. Finally, 3D printing can be used to create patient-specific medical devices, such as hearing aids and prosthetics, to customize them and make them more comfortable for patients.

Conclusion

Overall, 3D printing has revolutionized the world of radiology. It has allowed medical professionals to make more precise and accurate diagnoses, create custom medical devices, create models of organs, tissues, and bones, and create custom medical implants. This technology has enabled doctors to provide better patient care and has improved patient outcomes. With this kind of technology coupled with Artificial Intelligence, the sky is the limit.

Vesta Teleradiology is always looking to new technologies to improve our operations and further assist our clients in accurate and quick interpretations. Please reach out to us to learn about how we customize the process for your healthcare facility’s needs. 

 

What is a Smart Hospital?

Today’s smart hospital is not just a paperless organization with digitized charting. Although being digitized is an excellent start to a smart hospital, the process is much more advanced.

The goal of a smart hospital is better patient care while streamlining operational efficiency and costs. Three essential layers need to be addressed by a hospital to achieve the classification of a “smart” facility.

Step 1–Operations

Even though all hospitals gather information about their patients, operations, and management, a smart hospital takes gathering data to a different level.

In a smart hospital, analytic systems and software integrate all the information utilized by doctors, nurses, facility personnel, and administrators. A desktop, smartphone, or handheld device can access this information, resulting in faster, more efficient decision-making by key people.

With automated systems, the management of staff, pharmaceuticals, supplies, consumables inventory, assets, equipment, patients, and even visitors is controllable by the appropriate hospital teams. The process is cost-saving and efficient for the hospital and the patient.

To achieve these network-based services, hospitals with a large traffic volume and frequent environmental changes best utilize 5G or Wi-Fi 6 technology which is a step up for most hospital internet access.

Step 2–Clinical Tasks

The doctors’ and nurses’ efficiency depends on communication with departments like critical care, surgical, and technical (lab and X-ray) services.

A smart hospital improves patient outcomes by utilizing remote monitoring tools. Medical professionals can immediately monitor a patient’s vital signs, steps, heart rates, allergies, and lab results. The added communication also allows more patient input about likes, dislikes, and comfort zones. Smart hospitals will also utilize teleradiology services like Vesta in order to process more imaging interpretations remotely and efficiently.

 

INSIDE CANADA’S FIRST SMART HOSPITAL

Step 3-Patient Care

A patient’s room is very different within a smart hospital. A patient can access help through voice-based interactive devices to dim the lights, call a nurse, request pain medication, or make phone calls to loved ones—no more worries about a dropped call button on the floor.

The smart hospital design focuses on enhancing the healing process for faster recoveries by featuring open spaces and gardens. Children can also have specially designed areas for their comfort.

Caring robots in hospitals are providing added support in the facilities. Smart hospitals have programmed robots to perform surgeries; provide dementia care for the elderly; provide biofeedback for patient anxiety; transport supplies, blood, medication, meals, and garbage.

automation
Robots are reshaping hospitals

Hospitals have also programmed robots to provide care in quarantine isolation booths or entertain hospitalized children for a more positive emotional experience.

The Future

The future of smart hospital strategies is endless. The hospital environment and opportunities will continue to expand for the cost and convenience benefits of the hospital operations and its patients. The hospital will be able to extend most of the “smart” gifts to the patient’s home.

Patients will be able to take home smartwatches and other monitoring equipment for continued hospital care. More utilization of mobile monitoring equipment will allow the hospital to operate as intended–for emergencies, surgeries, and intensive care units–and will enable the patient to recover safely in the comfort of their home. And even more exciting is the future use of Artificial Intelligence to further enhance the benefits of the smart hospital.

 

The Benefits of Teleradiology for Hospitals

The many benefits of teleradiology have become increasingly important to urban and rural hospitals. Not only has the service greatly improved patient care, but it has also been a tremendous cost-saving for hospitals.

Teleradiology transmits X-rays and other diagnostic images from one location to another. The transmission allows medical information to be interpreted or consulted by specialists in the medical field practically anywhere in the world.

hospital radiology
An x-ray of a head

 

Many medical specialists reside and practice in large cities where the need for their services is in the highest demand. Also, hospitals and research centers in larger populated areas provide more financial support for radiologists’ services and resources, which can increase their productivity and field of study.

Better Patient Care

Teleradiology has torn down social, economic, age-related, and physical barriers to a patient’s ability to receive the best diagnostic care in the shortest possible time. Hospitals near and far have been able to do this by supporting their patients in implementing teleradiology services.

A patient does not need to travel great distances at enormous expense for expert diagnostic opinions any longer. Plus, delayed diagnoses can be critical to a patient’s health and well-being. With teleradiological services, a patient can receive an expert opinion within a short period from their location.

Teleradiology has enhanced a hospital’s emergency care by accessing a cooperating radiologist’s 24-hour/7 days per week availability. Before the technology was available, emergency room staff would need to wake up radiologists at home and request their presence in the hospital. Then the report may not be available for several days.

ambulance
Teleradiology can greatly enhance emergency care services

Patients can obtain a second opinion for their diagnosis much easier now with teleradiology. A hospital can send records anywhere worldwide at a patient’s request.

It also does not matter the hospital’s social or economic environmental location because all hospitals with the internet have access to highly valued diagnosticians.

Cost Benefits of Teleradiology

One of the most obvious cost benefits of teleradiology services for a hospital is the reduction–and sometimes the elimination–of radiologists. Hospitals can use allotted financial budgets for hands-on patient care.

With the cost savings of reduced staff, the hospital can also invest more money into the equipment for MRIs, CT scans, ultrasound, and digital X-ray equipment. More quality equipment can enhance the teleradiology process with better diagnostic tools for radiologists.

When hospitals access teleradiology services, the services charge by the radiological exam. Each consult with a radiologist is a case-by-case situation–much less expensive than having a full-time employed radiologist.

Other Benefits to the Hospitals

All hospitals rely on medical professionals collaborating to provide the best diagnoses for their patients. With teleradiology, distance for this collaboration is not a factor. Specialists can affect patient care by providing input to local hospital staff for diagnosis and care planning.

For a hospital’s staff, collaboration becomes education. The learning possibilities for teleradiology are endless, and the hospital team is learning from the best to become the best.

Hospitals have benefited from teleradiology tremendously over the past few years. The technology for this service is advancing rapidly and will continue to change the business of patient care for hospitals worldwide.

hospitals

Radiology Services for Hospitals from Vesta

No matter your facility’s size or location, Vesta offers comprehensive teleradiology services to hospitals. Look to us for efficiency, accuracy and competitive pricing. Please reach out to us to learn more about how we integrate with your current workflow.

 

What to Expect During a Breast Cancer Screening at an Imaging Center

The best way to detect breast cancer in its early stages is by mammograms–merely an X-ray of the breast. There is no financial strain because health insurance plans are required to cover the costs of mammograms every one or two years.

When you reach your forties, you should begin conversing with your medical providers about when to start and how often you should get a mammogram.

breast cancer awareness
Take care to get your screenings

 

Specialists usually recommend the procedure for women between 50 to 74 years of age at average risk of breast cancer and performed every one or two years depending on the woman’s risk factors.

How to Prepare for a Mammogram

When your healthcare provider suggests scheduling a mammogram for the first time, there are some considerations.

If possible, you should consider making your appointments at a nearby facility that specializes in mammograms. In doing this, you can have technicians who are very familiar with the process and accurately compare your mammograms yearly.

mammogram technology
Mammogram screening

If you need to change facilities, it’s best to arrange to have all your records sent to the new clinic for X-ray comparison. It is also an excellent idea to bring all the dates and locations of any previous breast procedures done.

Specialists advise that women avoid making mammogram appointments the week before their periods. Breasts are more swollen and sensitive during this time which can cause the mammogram procedure to be uncomfortable for them and may interfere with taking clear X-rays.

Technicians will advise that women wear pants or a skirt with a top that they can easily remove along with their bra. They also recommend that women do not use any deodorant, lotions, or powders that may show up as spots on the X-ray.

When You Arrive at the Imaging Center

Most technicians are very considerate and sensitive to what women experience during mammograms. They will ask you to undress above the waist and will give you a wrap to wear.

Many clinics have private dressing areas where you undress and wait for your technician to escort you into the X-ray room. There will only be the two of you in this area which is helpful to reduce any anxieties you may have.

You will stand in front of the mammogram machine, and the technician will position your body and breast for the most accurate X-rays. Your breast will rest on the device, and a plastic upper plate will lower and compress your breast.

The process takes 10 to 15 seconds for each body position, and there are usually only two or three X-rays taken per breast. The whole procedure only takes about 20 minutes.

Your Mammography Results

Mammography produces black-and-white digital images of your breast tissue that will be sent to a physician specializing in radiology to interpret. An imaging center could also refer to a teleradiology company to have a radiologist do the interpretation. Most clinics offer 2D mammograms for breast screening, but many facilities now offer 3D mammograms.

The radiologist will then report their findings to your healthcare provider. This process will take approximately ten days but could take longer. The radiology report will determine if you will need further X-rays, possible MRIs, or treatments. Physicians call back about 10 to 13% of women for abnormal findings, but most of these findings are not breast cancer.

Regular mammograms are an easy, safe way to screen for breast cancer. The most challenging part about the process may be remembering to make your annual appointment, and many women make their birthdays a reminder to make their yearly appointment.

What can be more celebratory than scheduling what may be a life-saving procedure for your health on the most important day of the year for you, your friends, and your loved ones? 

Ovarian Cancer: Encouraging Patients to Get Screened

It’s a topic not many people enjoy talking about, or even thinking about. Cancer, of any kind, is complicated, and ovarian cancer is, arguably, one of the most complicated and aggressive cancers there is. About 20% of women receive an early diagnosis, and of those detected early, 94% live longer than 5 years after their diagnosis, says the American Cancer Society. Encouraging patients to get screened for early detection, paying attention to the body’s signals, and regular exams are the biggest defenses we have against this deadly disease.

 

Ovarian cancer is difficult to detect, which is why it is paramount for patients to have regular pelvic exams. To help encourage patients to get the proper care for early detection, or with a new diagnosis, empower them with communication so they feel in charge, says Cancer Care. Suggesting the patient takes notes of the session will help, says the article, including dates, names, and discussion points. This will provide physical evidence of what went on during the appointment and a reference point for the possibly overwhelmed patient. Bringing a trusted friend or family member to the appointment can also ease the possible isolation or fear the patient may have. Another set of eyes and ears never hurts and the extra person may provide different questions and concerns the patient hadn’t thought of. Encouraging patients to write down questions or worries they may have before, during or after the appointment also gives the control back to the patient, says the article.

 

Persistent symptoms, even seemingly dismissible, should be examined. The fact is that ovarian cancer moves quickly, so before symptoms become worrisome, it’s important the patient knows her family history, says the American Cancer Society. If the patient has a strong family history of breast or ovarian cancer, has an inherited genetic syndrome, like Lynch syndrome, or a gene mutation such as BRCA, her high risk status must be presented and she must be heavily encouraged to get regular exams and to pay close attention to any changes within her body.

 

cancer awareness

 

The two most common screening tests for ovarian cancer are the transvaginal ultrasound (TVUS) and the CA-125 blood test, says American Cancer Society. The sound waves used during a TVUS detects abnormal shapes or measurements, says Healthline, and is about 75% effective, which is why you may order at CT scan, MRI, or a biopsy for further testing, says the article. The CA-125 blood test is not as reliable for ovarian cancer detection because high levels of the protein may not be an indicator of ovarian cancer, per se, but of inflammatory disease or endometriosis. Unfortunately, there aren’t many sure and simple tests to detect early ovarian cancer or recommend for your patient, says the CDC. Keeping your patients aware of these options may seem alarming, but they’ll know what to expect should the concern arise.

 

Telling your patients about genetic counseling is also a good option, says WebMd. For your high risk patients, genetic counseling will give them more concrete knowledge about their own bodies and family history. Should the patient’s test come back positive of a gene mutation, you will be aware of her risks and what to look out for during exams.

 

encourage your patients to get screened

 

Whether your patient is at high risk of ovarian cancer or not, urge them to consider regular exams and screening. There is research being done currently, says American Cancer Society, although the best and most proven way is through ultrasound and the CA-125 blood test. Reminding them you are always available if something in their body feels off, if they are in pain, or have been worried, is never a bad idea. Empower them to take charge of their health.

Teleradiology Interpretations for TVUS

Managing a healthcare practice means providing optimal care for your patients, and that includes providing the proper education and addressing patient concerns. We understand it is not always easy to balance running tests, interpretations and patient communication. That’s why Vesta has a team of US Board Certified radiologists who work with your team for preliminary and final interpretations – 24×7, nights, weekends and even holidays. Please contact us to learn more about our outsourced radiology services: 1-877-55-VESTA. 

Bone Health with BMD and DEXA Scans

Bone density is the ratio of skeletal weight (mass) to the volume or area of the bones. The heavier the bones, the stronger they will be. It affects physical activity levels, menopause, nerve signals, and more. A bone mineral density (BMD) scan compares your bone mass to an established norm and produces a score unique to you. This is different than a bone scan that looks for infections or cancer, or the presence of a fracture. A BMD scan helps determine the presence of osteopenia, osteoporosis, and the probability of future falls and fractures. A BMD score, combined with personal and family medical history, can help doctors get a complete picture of bone health.

 

bone density x-ray
bone scan

 

The types of diagnostic imaging used to measure bone density have included ultrasonography, CT and MRI images, and central dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry (DXA or DEXA) tests. In 1988, the dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry (DEXA) scan was approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for clinical use. Since then, DEXA has become the gold standard for measuring bone mineral density. Its scan of the large bones at the lumbar spine and hips is most used. Shorter scan times and minimal radiation exposure makes it safe. DEXA transmits photons at two energy levels for soft tissue and cortical bone and aids in the diagnosing of osteopenia, osteoporosis, and fracture risk assessment. It is inexpensive and the most accurate imaging modality for assessing bone mass density and health.

Doctors and radiologists use the BMD score to comprise a T-score or Z-score, which is a comparison to a reference group on a standard deviation scale. T-scores are given to adults and are determined by comparison to a young gender-matched group with peak bone mass. Z-scores are given to children and are determined by comparison to an age-matched group. These scores are used in risk fracture assessment, low bone mass or osteoporosis diagnosis, patient criteria for clinical trials, and management guidelines for osteoporosis. It is crucial that BMD measurements are correct, as well as differences in T-score and Z-score population groups. Accurate documentation is necessary for dependable results. Any variation used in this process can affect the actual T-score and Z-score. Improvements in calculation methods are currently ongoing.

Maintaining strong bones is essential. Daily calcium, vitamin D supplements, and weight-bearing exercises can help slow bone loss. In addition, patients should have their BMD checked regularly. Patients should also be counseled on safety measures like fall prevention.

patient and doctor
Doctors should counsel their patients on bone health

Top Teleradiology Company: Vesta

At Vesta Teleradiology, our U.S. Board Certified Radiologists are able to read and interpret DEXA scans. If you need supporting staff to cover nights, weekends and holidays, please reach out to us today: 1-877-55-VESTA.

Patient Safety Awareness Week: What Can Imaging Centers Do?

The foundation of health care lies with a diagnosis. Sometimes, medical professionals have barriers to providing an accurate diagnosis because they do not have the lab space or time.

This is where medical imaging centers offer invaluable assistance.

What are Imaging Centers?

Imaging centers are medical facilities run by board-certified and trained radiologists, emphasizing diagnostic and preventive healthcare. They provide a host of diagnostic tools and scans to protect and maintain your health by detecting health issues in their early stages.

What Can Imaging Centers Do?

Medical imaging centers use imaging diagnostic tools, and early-detection radiology scans to provide the following preventative screening services:

Heart Scan: This exam is a pain-free, non-invasive, highly accurate scan that only takes five minutes.

Lung Scan: Those who have ever smoked may be at higher risk for lung cancer, which can be detected with a low radiation scan.

Virtual Colonoscopy: This minimally invasive and accurate scan should be done every five years, and it is so gentle that patients do not require anesthesia.

Diagnostic Tools

Imaging centers have various tools and scans that allow physicians to monitor your health and notice potential problems. These machines often include:

X-Rays: Most people have taken at least one x-ray in their lifetime, typically at the dentist or hospital. They are a non-invasive and pain-free procedure that gives doctors a look inside the body.

 

MRI: A magnetic resonance imaging scan is another non-invasive diagnostic tool that creates images of your body’s internal systems using radio waves and magnets. MRIs are usually more detailed and are a safe way to diagnose and prevent issues. 

 

CT scan: Computed tomography scan works in tandem with specialized x-ray equipment and state-of-the-art computer systems to produce highly detailed images of the inside of the body, which can be used to identify and treat medical conditions.

 

PET/CT scan: A positron emission tomography scan is an imaging test that looks for signs of disease within the body by injecting tracers into the vein and following them under a PET scanner. This is a great way to visualize how well your tissues and organs are functioning.

When you work with an imaging center, you work alongside medical experts, including board-certified cardiologists, radiologists, pathologists, teleradiologists, and other subspecialists.

Benefits of Imaging Centers

The primary benefit of imaging centers is that they help medical professionals to detect and diagnose any disease at its most treatable, early stages. These diagnostic tools are essential in helping patients heal and survive. When you catch a medical issue early, you reduce the need for costly and invasive procedures.

Imaging center employees have the dual responsibility of caring for their patients while advocating for their safety throughout the process. Radiology and diagnostic tools, while minimally invasive, still present specific patient safety issues. Radiologists must ensure that patients and staff are protected from being directly harmed.

Patient Safety Awareness Week

Patient Safety Tips

Imaging centers can increase patient safety by ensuring that the environment is kept sanitary, quiet, with restorative lighting to encourage patient rest.

Creating a safe patient environment involves more than ensuring patient happiness. It involves high-quality patient care that is effective and efficient.

As part of a team caring for patients, radiologists are responsibility for patient safety, which can involve:

Patient safety is a crucial aspect of patient care and involves engaging and educating patients and their families. Health care providers are tasked to listen to their patients to support patient safety initiatives.

 

Teleradiology Services from Vesta

Vesta’s Teleradiology services benefit your healthcare facility because our processes integrate with your workflow. This level of efficiency helps you to better serve your patient with the quality care they need.