The Benefits of Teleradiology for Hospitals

The many benefits of teleradiology have become increasingly important to urban and rural hospitals. Not only has the service greatly improved patient care, but it has also been a tremendous cost-saving for hospitals.

Teleradiology transmits X-rays and other diagnostic images from one location to another. The transmission allows medical information to be interpreted or consulted by specialists in the medical field practically anywhere in the world.

hospital radiology

 

Many medical specialists reside and practice in large cities where the need for their services is in the highest demand. Also, hospitals and research centers in larger populated areas provide more financial support for radiologists’ services and resources, which can increase their productivity and field of study.

Better Patient Care

Teleradiology has torn down social, economic, age-related, and physical barriers to a patient’s ability to receive the best diagnostic care in the shortest possible time. Hospitals near and far have been able to do this by supporting their patients in implementing teleradiology services.

A patient does not need to travel great distances at enormous expense for expert diagnostic opinions any longer. Plus, delayed diagnoses can be critical to a patient’s health and well-being. With teleradiological services, a patient can receive an expert opinion within a short period from their location.

Teleradiology has enhanced a hospital’s emergency care by accessing a cooperating radiologist’s 24-hour/7 days per week availability. Before the technology was available, emergency room staff would need to wake up radiologists at home and request their presence in the hospital. Then the report may not be available for several days.

 

ambulance

Patients can obtain a second opinion for their diagnosis much easier now with teleradiology. A hospital can send records anywhere worldwide at a patient’s request.

It also does not matter the hospital’s social or economic environmental location because all hospitals with the internet have access to highly valued diagnosticians.

Cost Benefits of Teleradiology

One of the most obvious cost benefits of teleradiology for a hospital is the reduction–and sometimes the elimination–of radiologists. Hospitals can use allotted financial budgets for hands-on patient care.

With the cost savings of reduced staff, the hospital can also invest more money into the equipment for MRIs, CT scans, ultrasound, and digital X-ray equipment. More quality equipment can enhance the teleradiology process with better diagnostic tools for radiologists.

When hospitals access teleradiology services, the services charge by the radiological exam. Each consult with a radiologist is a case-by-case situation–much less expensive than having a full-time employed radiologist.

Other Benefits to the Hospitals

All hospitals rely on medical professionals collaborating to provide the best diagnoses for their patients. With teleradiology, distance for this collaboration is not a factor. Specialists can affect patient care by providing input to local hospital staff for diagnosis and care planning.

For a hospital’s staff, collaboration becomes education. The learning possibilities for teleradiology are endless, and the hospital team is learning from the best to become the best.

Hospitals have benefited from teleradiology tremendously over the past few years. The technology for this service is advancing rapidly and will continue to change the business of patient care for hospitals worldwide.

hospitals

Radiology Services for Hospitals from Vesta

No matter your facility’s size or location, Vesta offers comprehensive teleradiology solutions to hospitals. Look to us for efficiency, accuracy and competitive pricing. Please reach out to us to learn more about how we integrate with your current workflow.

 

How is Technology Helping with the Healthcare Labor Shortage?

The COVID-19 pandemic may seem never ending. While the exposure and infection numbers may be shrinking, the long-lasting effects of this illness are revealing themselves. One of the biggest and most concerning shortages is the labor shortage.

Of course, labor shortage can be vague. What industries are seeing these shortages, and how do those shortages affect customers? Many industries are seeing labor shortages, but one of the most concerning is the healthcare labor shortage.

staffing and labor shortage
Burnout has led many to quit their healthcare jobs

The Healthcare Labor Shortage

The COVID-19 pandemic proved to be tough on several fronts, especially for the first responders providing care and assistance to those suffering. Doctors and nurses were on the front lines treating patients, finding answers, and working long hours. Many healthcare workers were forced out for different physical and mental reasons like burnout. The pressures were so great that nearly 1.5 million healthcare workers left the profession in the first two months of the pandemic.

As the pandemic continues to wane, healthcare workers are returning to hospitals and doctors’ offices. The return is great, but the numbers are still down, and jobs are still left vacant. In fact, healthcare employment has still not returned to pre-pandemic numbers. Even in those who have returned, anecdotal evidence suggests many are thinking of leaving soon. This means sick people, some of the most vulnerable in society, will feel the consequences. 

Technology and the Healthcare Labor shortage

How do healthcare providers keep their invaluable workers and staff? How do they combat the pressures and stressors created and highlighted by the worldwide pandemic? The short answer is technology.

Healthcare providers can automate different tasks to allow healthcare providers – doctors and nurses – the freedom and space to care for patients. The best news is we live in the age of technology. There are dozens of different technological applications that can be used in these areas.

Inbound Calls

Hospitals and doctors’ offices are often overloaded by inbound calls, even when they are fully staffed. When these providers are understaffed, however, it can be time-consuming to field these ceaseless inbound calls. Patients can and should be encouraged to schedule their own appointments through web-based applications and portals. Not only will this open up more time and space for healthcare providers, but these tasks help empower patients to be more involved in their healthcare journey.

 

staffing in healthcare
Technology allows patients to book their appointments online

 Intake Process

The amount of paperwork in the healthcare industry is daunting. Technology, however, can limit the paperwork and streamline the intake process altogether. Mobile check-in and registration can make it easier for patients to check in, but it also limits the person-to-person contact that so easily spreads diseases.

 Access and Availability

Perhaps the best advantage of medicine is the access and availability afforded through telemedicine. Telemedicine isn’t necessarily “new,” but it has been brought to the forefront. Telemedicine is the ability to meet with medical professionals and healthcare workers to get information and establish treatment plans.

It’s especially beneficial when it comes to specialized medicine, like radiology. Teleradiology, the term widely used for this specific section, is a much more recent development. It helps patients get information and necessary access to radiology professionals.

Teleradiology allows a radiologist to get, review, and interpret CT or MRI images. Radiologists are able to communicate important information to patients who are desperate for that information. It means fewer radiologists can meet with more patients and get those patients the information and treatment they need.

Virtual Monitoring Systems

Telesitter programs help reduce the workload and potential burnout for nurses. With these systems, cameras are setup so that virtual monitoring can take place and track patient activity. Any time there are concerns or emergencies, staff would be notified.

telemonitoring
Telesitters offer virtual monitoring

The world is changing. It’s the one true constant. But technology offers us the chance to adapt and modify the ways we move about in the world. Technology can make things easier and fill in the gaps that form.

What to Expect During a Breast Cancer Screening at an Imaging Center

The best way to detect breast cancer in its early stages is by mammograms–merely an X-ray of the breast. There is no financial strain because health insurance plans are required to cover the costs of mammograms every one or two years.

When you reach your forties, you should begin conversing with your medical providers about when to start and how often you should get a mammogram.

breast cancer awareness

 

Specialists usually recommend the procedure for women between 50 to 74 years of age at average risk of breast cancer and performed every one or two years depending on the woman’s risk factors.

How to Prepare for a Mammogram

When your healthcare provider suggests scheduling a mammogram for the first time, there are some considerations.

If possible, you should consider making your appointments at a nearby facility that specializes in mammograms. In doing this, you can have technicians who are very familiar with the process and accurately compare your mammograms yearly.

mammogram technology

If you need to change facilities, it’s best to arrange to have all your records sent to the new clinic for X-ray comparison. It is also an excellent idea to bring all the dates and locations of any previous breast procedures done.

Specialists advise that women avoid making mammogram appointments the week before their periods. Breasts are more swollen and sensitive during this time which can cause the mammogram procedure to be uncomfortable for them and may interfere with taking clear X-rays.

Technicians will advise that women wear pants or a skirt with a top that they can easily remove along with their bra. They also recommend that women do not use any deodorant, lotions, or powders that may show up as spots on the X-ray.

When You Arrive at the Imaging Center

Most technicians are very considerate and sensitive to what women experience during mammograms. They will ask you to undress above the waist and will give you a wrap to wear.

Many clinics have private dressing areas where you undress and wait for your technician to escort you into the X-ray room. There will only be the two of you in this area which is helpful to reduce any anxieties you may have.

You will stand in front of the mammogram machine, and the technician will position your body and breast for the most accurate X-rays. Your breast will rest on the device, and a plastic upper plate will lower and compress your breast.

The process takes 10 to 15 seconds for each body position, and there are usually only two or three X-rays taken per breast. The whole procedure only takes about 20 minutes.

Your Mammography Results

Mammography produces black-and-white digital images of your breast tissue that will be sent to a physician specializing in radiology to interpret. An imaging center could also refer to a teleradiology company to have a radiologist do the interpretation. Most clinics offer 2D mammograms for breast screening, but many facilities now offer 3D mammograms.

The radiologist will then report their findings to your healthcare provider. This process will take approximately ten days but could take longer. The radiology report will determine if you will need further X-rays, possible MRIs, or treatments. Physicians call back about 10 to 13% of women for abnormal findings, but most of these findings are not breast cancer.

Regular mammograms are an easy, safe way to screen for breast cancer. The most challenging part about the process may be remembering to make your annual appointment, and many women make their birthdays a reminder to make their yearly appointment.

What can be more celebratory than scheduling what may be a life-saving procedure for your health on the most important day of the year for you, your friends, and your loved ones? 

Creative Mammogram Awareness Campaigns  

Just before October 2022–Breast Cancer Awareness Month–Katie Couric publicly revealed that her mammogram a few months earlier had alerted her doctors that she needed further medical tests, and this testing led to her diagnosis of breast cancer. Fortunately, she and her doctors had caught her cancer early on and had time to act on the diagnosis.

Katie’s career as a successful news anchor brought attention to the reality that breast cancer can happen to anyone. She felt her bold announcement of the disease might help reduce new cases of invasive breast cancer. That was her objective with many interviews and publicity on television, in magazines, and other media.

cancer awareness

Campaigns are More Important This Year

During the pandemic, many women went without seeing their physicians or getting mammograms. The Journal of American Medical Association estimates breast cancer screenings have reduced by 6% in the past two years. With breast cancer causing worldwide deaths of over 685,000 in 2020, early detection with mammograms is essential.

Mammograms are just an X-ray to detect abnormalities in a woman’s breast tissue; however, these images have found cancers up to 3 years before a patient can feel any lumps in the breast tissue.

Just about everyone is aware of the importance of mammograms in the fight against breast cancer, but many do not follow through with the process of making and showing up for mammogram appointments. Creative campaigns to motivate women to follow through with their health care can save many lives.

Campaign Strategies

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has issued a digital media toolkit to focus constructive messages to the public about Breast Cancer Awareness. The toolkit is structured to empower women to take control of their health and do what they must do for an early diagnosis of breast cancer.

breast cancer awareness campaign

Every campaign initiated by organizations, workplaces, and individuals should emphasize routine mammograms because they can be the key to saving a woman’s life. The mammogram is an easy exam, but it’s equally easy to forget or delay.

During October, many clinics or private practitioners offer free mammograms to low-income or uninsured women between the ages of 40 and 64. Individuals can help these organizations get the word out to the public by volunteering to help spread the word. The word free is a very effective campaign strategy.

The Susan G. Komen Foundation has multiple races across the country to bring awareness and financial support for breast cancer awareness. Their strategy is to create an event for the participants to go out and raise money for their cause. Their strategy is power in numbers, and the walks have been very successful for the foundation.

Employers can get involved with campaigns for their employees as well. Workplace wellness plans have partnered with their insurance companies to offer personal assessments for their employees, bring in mobile mammography vans, and promote educational information for the women in their workplace.

Anyone can have a successful campaign to bring awareness to breast cancer prevention and early detection. Finding strategies that work for each individual, community, and culture can sometimes be challenging but worth the effort. After all, it is about getting the word out and, more importantly, saving lives.

Read More Mammograms with Teleradiology

By partnering with a teleradiology company like Vesta, you will be able to get more mammogram screenings done since we can handle the interpretations for you, days, nights and weekends. Want to learn more about how we integrate with your workflow? Contact us now for a free quote and overview: 1-877-55-VESTA.

Why is There a Radiologist Shortage and What Can Be Done?

Association of American Medical Colleges states that radiologist burnout and the demographics of the workforce have been critical for years. For example, 82% of the 20,950 currently active radiologists are over 45 and over, while 53%  are 55 or over. According to a recent Mayo Clinic study, radiologists ranked fifth out of 23 specialties that reported burnout rate, particularly among those screening for breast cancer. So not only are radiologists aging out, the newcomers aren’t lasting that long.

Why Are Radiologists Being Burned Out?

Radiology Business says radiologists mention things like “lack of respect” from administrators or colleagues as one of the leading causes of burnout 60%, along with lack of control or autonomy over one’s life, long work hours, too many non-essential tasks, and more. That tempered with COVID-related burnout and we are now facing a global shortage of radiologists and radiology trainees.

shortage of radiologists
Burnout has impacted healthcare staffing

 

According to a Diagnostic Imaging podcast, numerous factors result in radiologist burnout, from outdated and clunky software, sinking reimbursements, continuing education requirements, stressful imaging reports turnout expectations, to reduced interaction with colleagues related to the pandemic, all resulting in a slow, laborious system death.

Should You Consider Teleradiology/Outsourced Radiology Company?

If you have never heard of teleradiology or outsourcing radiology, you may be interested in learning that many clinics, offices, and hospitals are turning to medical outsourcing. Hospitals will likely start to engage more and more outsourced services that can include long-distance radiology and teleradiology. While there are pros and cons for hospitals and clinics using teleradiology, the fact is that this may quickly become a fact of life. Patient care can still be high-quality, immediate, and efficient, for example.

There are incredible benefits that come with radiology outsourcing companies and teleradiology. Many teleradiology practices employ board-certified and trained radiologists for neurological and Body Imaging needs. These radiologists are available for patient consultations to go over results, answer any questions, and much more. Plus, these services are often quick and done promptly. Many of these companies and services are coupled with a quality assurance program to maintain their ACR accreditation. Finally, these services tend to be more cost-effective than in-house services. Teleradiology and outsourced services are often used in the following practices:

  •     Private practices
  •     Urgent care clinics
  •     Imaging practices
  •     Mobile services
  •     Physician groups
  •     Independent diagnostic testing facilities
teleradiology
Teleradiology can assist with staffing shortages

What Does the Future of Radiology Look Like?

One popular solution that addresses the shortage of radiologists includes using a teleradiology/outsourced radiology company as mentioned above.

Another solution is using trained radiographers to double-read screening mammograms, extending their expertise and skill set to perform as radiologists when needed. Double reading has been used in Europe and has been incredibly efficient at detecting cancer. Training non-radiologists may end up becoming a necessity for hospitals and breast screening facilities without having to lose patient standards.

Radiology remains a solid and stable career, especially as medical professionals and facilities adapt to shortages, and potential pandemics, especially when considering teleradiology and outsourced radiology companies.

Vesta Teleradiology: For Full or Supportive Radiology Staffing Needs

Whether your healthcare facility need full-time support, or just coverage for nights and weekend radiology interpretations, Vesta is here for you! Vesta has dedicated 15 years to serving diagnostic imaging centers, physician’s offices, hospitals and other healthcare facilities with their radiology needs. Contact us for a free quote: 1-877-55-VESTA.

 

Ovarian Cancer: Encouraging Patients to Get Screened

It’s a topic not many people enjoy talking about, or even thinking about. Cancer, of any kind, is complicated, and ovarian cancer is, arguably, one of the most complicated and aggressive cancers there is. About 20% of women receive an early diagnosis, and of those detected early, 94% live longer than 5 years after their diagnosis, says the American Cancer Society. Encouraging patients to get screened for early detection, paying attention to the body’s signals, and regular exams are the biggest defenses we have against this deadly disease.

 

Ovarian cancer is difficult to detect, which is why it is paramount for patients to have regular pelvic exams. To help encourage patients to get the proper care for early detection, or with a new diagnosis, empower them with communication so they feel in charge, says Cancer Care. Suggesting the patient takes notes of the session will help, says the article, including dates, names, and discussion points. This will provide physical evidence of what went on during the appointment and a reference point for the possibly overwhelmed patient. Bringing a trusted friend or family member to the appointment can also ease the possible isolation or fear the patient may have. Another set of eyes and ears never hurts and the extra person may provide different questions and concerns the patient hadn’t thought of. Encouraging patients to write down questions or worries they may have before, during or after the appointment also gives the control back to the patient, says the article.

 

Persistent symptoms, even seemingly dismissible, should be examined. The fact is that ovarian cancer moves quickly, so before symptoms become worrisome, it’s important the patient knows her family history, says the American Cancer Society. If the patient has a strong family history of breast or ovarian cancer, has an inherited genetic syndrome, like Lynch syndrome, or a gene mutation such as BRCA, her high risk status must be presented and she must be heavily encouraged to get regular exams and to pay close attention to any changes within her body.

 

cancer awareness

 

The two most common screening tests for ovarian cancer are the transvaginal ultrasound (TVUS) and the CA-125 blood test, says American Cancer Society. The sound waves used during a TVUS detects abnormal shapes or measurements, says Healthline, and is about 75% effective, which is why you may order at CT scan, MRI, or a biopsy for further testing, says the article. The CA-125 blood test is not as reliable for ovarian cancer detection because high levels of the protein may not be an indicator of ovarian cancer, per se, but of inflammatory disease or endometriosis. Unfortunately, there aren’t many sure and simple tests to detect early ovarian cancer or recommend for your patient, says the CDC. Keeping your patients aware of these options may seem alarming, but they’ll know what to expect should the concern arise.

 

Telling your patients about genetic counseling is also a good option, says WebMd. For your high risk patients, genetic counseling will give them more concrete knowledge about their own bodies and family history. Should the patient’s test come back positive of a gene mutation, you will be aware of her risks and what to look out for during exams.

 

encourage your patients to get screened

 

Whether your patient is at high risk of ovarian cancer or not, urge them to consider regular exams and screening. There is research being done currently, says American Cancer Society, although the best and most proven way is through ultrasound and the CA-125 blood test. Reminding them you are always available if something in their body feels off, if they are in pain, or have been worried, is never a bad idea. Empower them to take charge of their health.

Teleradiology Interpretations for TVUS

Managing a healthcare practice means providing optimal care for your patients, and that includes providing the proper education and addressing patient concerns. We understand it is not always easy to balance running tests, interpretations and patient communication. That’s why Vesta has a team of US Board Certified radiologists who work with your team for preliminary and final interpretations – 24×7, nights, weekends and even holidays. Please contact us to learn more about our outsourced radiology services: 1-877-55-VESTA. 

Differences Between Preliminary and Final Radiology Interpretations  

A radiology report interprets images into words. The requesting physician who requests the radiology reports recommends treatment to their patient based on the findings a radiologist provides in these reports. A patient’s understanding of preliminary or final radiology interpretations is critical in treatment decisions.

An on-call radiology resident or technician may be issuing the preliminary radiology report at a hospital emergency room or an urgent care facility. A physician may need to act on the findings of this initial report before a final interpretation by the radiological physician overseeing the resident or technician.

Studies have shown a minimal discrepancy rate when physicians review the preliminary report with the final findings. A few factors, like the imaging technique and the technician’s experience level, account for most modifications in the final reports.

Why Have Preliminary Radiology Interpretation?

Hospital funding in rural areas and 24-hour urgent care facilities cannot always afford an on-staff radiology physician, and they rely on teleradiology interpretations. However, if a patient in pain arrives at the facility, the physician needs immediate information on how to proceed with the patient’s treatment.

 

preliminary reading
A radiologist examines an x-ray

An example may be if the patient complains about severe abdominal pain. The physician must rely on the technician’s preliminary report defining acute appendicitis and perform emergency surgery. Another example may be a possible stroke victim brought into the facility. The physician cannot wait for a final report to make a life-saving decision with the patients.

Radiologist Physician Expertise for a Final Report

Few people understand the extensive education and dedication a Radiologist Physician undergoes during their career. They graduate from medical school, complete their internships and residency requirements, and interpret thousands of exams under supervision. These are just a few of the provisions of licensing.

The extensive requirements of completing a radiologist physician program limit the number of physicians available for final radiology interpretations.

With the advancement of technology in the field, teleradiology has broadened the possibility of more accessible and punctual final reads from radiologists. In most cases, it can make the need for preliminary reporting almost obsolete.

Besides an emergency, another exception may be for very complicated cases where second reads of the imagery may be pertinent to a diagnosis or treatment plan. In these cases, it is most beneficial to have a preliminary report, a second read, then a final report issued before making any decisions.

The primary goal of physicians is to make a difference in the lives of their patients, and they can do this by having timely, accurate, and well-defined information. Continuing improvement of the technical aspects of the radiology field will allow the radiologist to expeditiously provide final radiology interpretations and assist in improving patient management.

 

final interpretation
Teleradiology offers hospitals and healthcare facilities an efficient way of completing interpretations

US Board Certified Teleradiologists from Vesta

At Vesta Teleradiology, our US Board Certified Radiologists can assist your facility with both preliminary and final interpretations, including subspecialty solutions like: nuclear medicine, body imaging, gastrointestinal/genitourinary diagnoses, cardiac angiography and thoracic radiology.

 

Recent Advancements in Nuclear Medicine

The medical community is always looking for new and better ways to serve patients and save lives. Science, medicine, and technology often intersect to break barriers and create innovative new treatments – and nowhere is that truer than in the field of nuclear medicine.

What is Nuclear Medicine?

The National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering defines nuclear medicine as a specialty that uses radioactive tracers to diagnose and treat disease. Nuclear medicine is invaluable for patient care, as it can help detect disorders in the bones, gall bladder, heart, and much more.

advancements in nuclear medicine

This field has seen tremendous advancements in recent years, which offer the potential for incredible and life-saving benefits. Here are some of the latest developments in nuclear medicine.

Making AI More Effective

Artificial intelligence has been an integral part of medicine for decades, particularly in the realm of diagnostics. And now, new research suggests that nuclear medicine may make AI-based diagnostics even more effective.

radiology interpretations

For example, researchers in the Journal of Nuclear Medicine (JNM) suggest that nuclear imaging can help with machine learning and AI cancer diagnoses. This is because nuclear imaging creates a high contrast between tumors and normal tissue, making it much easier for the machine to identify abnormalities. Combining AI diagnostics with nuclear medicine can make the machines more accurate, which will ultimately result in better patient care over time.

Detecting Heart Disease

Radionuclide imaging has long been used to detect issues in patient heart function. However, researchers are beginning to explore new uses for this technology – including the examination of the heart’s very molecules.

Research from 2020 found that radionuclide imaging is successful at detecting cardiac amyloidosis, a rare condition in which a protein called amyloid is deposited in the cardiac muscle. Amyloid deposits can cause buildup over time and ultimately lead to heart failure, so it is very important to detect this condition as early as possible.

Discovering New Treatments

Nuclear medicine has many potential uses for imaging and diagnostics. However, it also offers many benefits for researchers.

For example, scientists at the Vanderbilt University Institute of Imaging Science recently used a radioligand (a radioactive substance used to study receptors in the body) to study whether an antioxidant called ERGO could penetrate the brain and protect against oxidative stress. The study successfully proved that ERGO can penetrate the brains of mice, which opens doors for further research on using this antioxidant to treat conditions like Alzheimer’s disease.

Nuclear medicine is always developing and advancing, and each advance makes it easier to give patients the care they deserve. 

 

Nuclear Radiology Readings

 

We are proud of our talented pool of teleradiologists who specialize in a variety of subspecialties, including nuclear radiology. If you’ would like to learn more about how we can integrate with your current workflow in order to provide preliminary and final interpretations, please contact us now at 1-877-55-VESTA

Bone Health with BMD and DEXA Scans

Bone density is the ratio of skeletal weight (mass) to the volume or area of the bones. The heavier the bones, the stronger they will be. It affects physical activity levels, menopause, nerve signals, and more. A bone mineral density (BMD) scan compares your bone mass to an established norm and produces a score unique to you. This is different than a bone scan that looks for infections or cancer, or the presence of a fracture. A BMD scan helps determine the presence of osteopenia, osteoporosis, and the probability of future falls and fractures. A BMD score, combined with personal and family medical history, can help doctors get a complete picture of bone health.

 

bone density x-ray

 

The types of diagnostic imaging used to measure bone density have included ultrasonography, CT and MRI images, and central dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry (DXA or DEXA) tests. In 1988, the dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry (DEXA) scan was approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for clinical use. Since then, DEXA has become the gold standard for measuring bone mineral density. Its scan of the large bones at the lumbar spine and hips is most used. Shorter scan times and minimal radiation exposure makes it safe. DEXA transmits photons at two energy levels for soft tissue and cortical bone and aids in the diagnosing of osteopenia, osteoporosis, and fracture risk assessment. It is inexpensive and the most accurate imaging modality for assessing bone mass density and health.

Doctors and radiologists use the BMD score to comprise a T-score or Z-score, which is a comparison to a reference group on a standard deviation scale. T-scores are given to adults and are determined by comparison to a young gender-matched group with peak bone mass. Z-scores are given to children and are determined by comparison to an age-matched group. These scores are used in risk fracture assessment, low bone mass or osteoporosis diagnosis, patient criteria for clinical trials, and management guidelines for osteoporosis. It is crucial that BMD measurements are correct, as well as differences in T-score and Z-score population groups. Accurate documentation is necessary for dependable results. Any variation used in this process can affect the actual T-score and Z-score. Improvements in calculation methods are currently ongoing.

Maintaining strong bones is essential. Daily calcium, vitamin D supplements, and weight-bearing exercises can help slow bone loss. In addition, patients should have their BMD checked regularly. Patients should also be counseled on safety measures like fall prevention.

patient and doctor

Top Teleradiology Company: Vesta

At Vesta Teleradiology, our U.S. Board Certified Radiologists are able to read and interpret DEXA scans. If you need supporting staff to cover nights, weekends and holidays, please reach out to us today: 1-877-55-VESTA.

Benefits of Mobile Imaging for Outpatient Healthcare

Most of the healthcare provided by physicians involves some method of imaging. In the past, technicians have performed diagnostic services in the imaging departments of hospitals. Today, imaging services are brought to the patient with the help of mobile imaging.

 

Since there is such a high demand for x-rays, ultrasounds, MRI, CT scans, and EKGs, in-house hospital departments tend to be overwhelmed, and patients can have long wait times in crowded waiting rooms. Even getting an appointment for the imaging service can take a long time which delays treatment for the patient’s care.

 

With the emergence of mobile imaging, patients have more accessible, more efficient access to imaging services. With faster access to the patient, healthcare professionals can diagnose their patients more quickly and begin necessary treatments.

mobile radiology for assisted living

Senior Population and Imaging

The best example of the benefits of mobile imaging is with the senior population–many of whom reside in assisted living facilities and nursing homes. Persons over the age of 65 are a fragile population who need imaging services frequently.

The older age group has an increased fall rate, a higher rate of pneumonia and cancers, and compromised immune systems.  They need prompt diagnoses, but transportation to receive medical care is complicated.

The benefits are vast when mobile imaging can accommodate this population’s needs:

  • Overall, costs are reduced for the service because the facility doesn’t need to transport the patient to a hospital imaging department.
  • Understaffed facilities don’t need to assign an employee to accompany the patient for diagnostic imaging in a hospital.
  • There are fewer transfers between facility and hospital.
  • Mobile imaging services reduce anxiety in the elderly because transporting and waiting for imaging services accentuates fear in the undiagnosed.
  • There is a reduced need for hospitalizations and outpatient treatments of the patients because the assisted living facilities and nursing homes can provide prescribed care.
  • Mobile imaging can provide needed diagnostic information to the patient’s attending physician faster than an imaging department can, which expedites a treatment plan for the patient.
  • The patient can remain in familiar surroundings (and with people they know) while receiving diagnostic imaging services. This benefit is significant when the patient has difficulty understanding or processing information.

When people of any age are hurting, fearful, anxious, or lack understanding, their comfort is the most crucial factor in beneficial treatments. Mobile imaging comes to the patient and provides fast, efficient, accessible, and cost-effective diagnostics for the most fragile patients.

 Working with a Teleradiology Company

With Vesta Teleradiology, we work with mobile imaging centers and any health facility that provides this technology to their patients. We work with your workflow and integrate to your technology so sending and receiving scans is a breeze. Learn more about how we can help you now: call us at 1-877-55-VESTA.

teleradiology services